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C., in 1923, attempted to transmit audio between cities via low-quality telegraph lines.AT&T refused outside companies access to its high-quality phone lines.

In the 1930s, NBC also developed a network for shortwave radio stations, called the NBC White Network.In 1927, NBC moved its operations to 711 Fifth Avenue in Manhattan, occupying the upper floors of a building designed by architect Floyd Brown.Initially, the Orange Network recreated Eastern Red Network programming for West Coast stations at KPO in San Francisco.In 1936, the Orange Network affiliate stations became part of the Red Network, and at the same time the Gold Network became part of the Blue Network.This was followed by the debut of the NBC Gold Network, also known as the Pacific Gold Network, on October 18, 1931.

The Orange Network carried Red Network programming, and the Gold Network carried programming from the Blue Network.

The space that NBC occupied was designed by Raymond Hood, who based the appearance of its multiple studio facilities on "a Gothic church, the Roman forum, a Louis XIV room and, in a space devoted to jazz, something 'wildly futuristic, with plenty of color in bizarre designs.'" In 1930, General Electric was charged with antitrust violations, resulting in the company's decision to divest itself of RCA.

The newly separate company signed leases to move its corporate headquarters into the new Rockefeller Center in 1931. Rockefeller, Jr., founder and financier of Rockefeller Center, arranged the deal with GE chairman Owen D. When it moved into the complex in 1933, RCA became the lead tenant at 30 Rockefeller Plaza, known as the "RCA Building" (later the GE Building, now the Comcast Building), which housed NBC's production studios as well as theaters for RCA-owned RKO Pictures.

During a period of early broadcast business consolidation, radio manufacturer Radio Corporation of America (RCA) acquired New York City radio station WEAF from American Telephone & Telegraph (AT&T).

Westinghouse, a shareholder in RCA, had a competing outlet in Newark, New Jersey pioneer station WJZ (no relation to the radio and television station in Baltimore currently using those call letters), which also served as the flagship for a loosely structured network.

AT&T offered to sell the station to RCA in a deal that included the right to lease AT&T's phone lines for network transmission.